Some days, you never know what you're going to see when you leave the house

Yesterday was one of those days. Because of work, I get up pretty early every day. So in a lot of cases, I don't expect much to be going on in the world when I start to get moving. Especially things that are loud, kind of scary, and kind of awesome. You don't expect stuff like that at 6:45 in the morning in a quiet neighborhood like mine.

But on this day, I was treated to the most horrendous sight. Well, horrendous is a strong word, hahaha. But, what was happening was this giant construction vehicle that was basically a giant shredder on wheels, with a boom that went a few dozen feet in the air. The shredder would go to the top of a smallish tree, and then basically buzz it flat.

Ok, it was more fascinating than terrifying

Really, that's the case. For instance, my dog didn't even bark at it. Nor did he seem even particularly phased by it, though it was loud as all get-out. Granted, my dog is also not phased by me playing drums in the house, so I guess he's tougher than his Papa. But it truly was crazy how fast this thing turns whole trees into mulch. Check it out...

See what I mean?! The whole video is like, 45 seconds long, and a tree and a half met their maker. I probably stood there watching for a few minutes more as well, because I was just so mesmerized by the process. Of course, now I want one for my own yard. Even a handheld version for branches on the back path would be great.

At any rate, enjoy that little time suck that just killed roughly one minute of your day. Of course, if you need to kill an hour, you could just put it on loop. It'll make you oddly happy, I promise.

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