When all was said and done following this past Saturday's fire on the Finson Road in Bangor that destroyed a building and its two apartments within, a faint voice was heard under a box spring that had frozen to the floor.

It happened long after the Bangor Fire Department had left, days later, when a tenant and a couple of guys from Bangor Housing were making their way through one of the destroyed apartments.  A cry of a meek feline in distress.

The interview of the two men from Bangor Housing conducted by Morgan Sturdiviant of WABI TV5 was posted to Facebook this afternoon, and the men talk of their amazement of finding Willow the kitty still alive under the burnt out bedding some three days later.

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"We dug her out, and she was fine.  Afraid she only has 7 lives left, but she was fine", one of the men told Ms. Sturdiviant.  The reporter then asked what it was like to find the cat alive and well for the family that had lost so much, and the other man responded, "It was pretty nice to see a smile come across their face because the last few days have been very rough on all of these families.  So, to have a bright spot in that moment, was a pretty nice moment."

"It was a bright spot in a dark time, I guess you could say", one of the men from Bangor Housing told the reporter.

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