It may be far in the back of the mind for some, but others, especially those who travel for work, are going to want to take note: Covid-19 has changed the way hotels are doing business.

In order to limit person-to-person contact, and in the interest of safety, hotels across the nation, not just here in Maine, will be making some adjustments. And it's going to make your stay "away" feel a little different.

According to an article on the website, businessinsider.com, "As states and countries begin to reopen, the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) has released new safety and cleaning guidelines for the hotel industry. Major hotel brands like Marriott, Hilton, and Wyndham have pledged to abide by the new protocols."

That buffet breakfast you've have always loved...that's a thing of the past. If they offer food, it will likely be pre-packaged, grab-and-go options with disposable silverware. The other possibility would be to be served by an attendant who was wearing personal protective equipment. Sneeze and cough guards will likely be the norm. And should you want room service, its kind of the same deal. It will be delivered to you, and left outside your door, bagged up, by someone in PPE.

Getting your room cleaned daily...also something that won't be done anymore, unless specifically requested. The new guidelines state that cleaning personnel should not enter occupied guest rooms for the duration of that guest's stay. In between guests, the cleaning staff will do a thorough cleaning, concentrating on things people touch the most; light switches, faucets, door knobs, etc. But no one will be coming to make your bed ever morning, or offer a turn down service, when you leave for the day.

To facilitate a "contactless" check in, checking into and paying for your rooms will now be done primarily on your phone, likely through an app. And most places will be asking you to park your own car now, phasing out options like valet parking.

It almost seems "anti-hospitable"--to mask the smiling faces and limit the services or an industry like the hospitality industry. I totally get it, don't get me wrong. It's just weird to me, like everything else we've had to change around because of this virus. I don't travel often, and I think that's why the small luxuries always seemed so fancy to me. It will be strange to do away with those things, but I hope, in the long run, it will translate to keeping people healthy. And that's something I think we can all get behind.