This year is a year of challenging the norms, including how we do our traditions.  Halloween was no different.

We either opted out of the traditionally trick-or-treating to avoid the transmission of coronavirus altogether or practiced social distancing while trying to trick-or-treat.

Here were a couple of ideas on how to pass out candy:

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Here's how Sarah celebrated Halloween with the family:

Me and the hubs had decided earlier in October that Halloween was going to be different this year.  We decided to stay home and find a different way for the kids to have fun.

First, we decided to get a ton of candy and toss some in little lunch bags.  We got a bunch of the glow-in-the-dark bracelets of three different colors and then placed the bags throughout the dooryard, backyard, into the woods, in trees, wherever.

We told the kids to get dressed up while we dispersed the bags, waited until dark, gave the kids some flashlights, assigned them each one of the glow-in-the dark colors that we had put in the bags and let them run around trying to find their candy.  We made sure each kid had about the same amount of candy, so everything was fair.

From there, we came inside, ate some pizza.  Then, we played a family trivia game where I asked everybody questions about each other, as a way to get more candy.  That was probably the most fun part of the night.  Lot's of candy got thrown around before we got a little halloween show on for Jack, put him to bed then, a Halloween movie on for the older kids.

I fell asleep around the time that Jack went to bed, but I was informed that the family had watched the old classic 'Clue' with Tim Curry, Susan Sarandon and all those people.

It was a different kind of Halloween but, most definitely the most memorable so far.  And the kids had fun.  That's all that mattered.

Here's what Cori did:

Halloween, at my house, is typically a big deal. I make my taco-pizza soup, friends and family come in and out and eat then tick-or-treat. But his year, We knew this year was going to be different. We have a pretty close-knit neighborhood, so we started by discussing, in advance, what folks felt comfortable doing. Many planned to either have pre-bagged candy in a bowl outside, or other socially distanced options. I checked on a local Neighborhood Watch website, and they had a google map document where people could mark their house as taking part in socially-distant trick-or treating. They had over a hundred houses signed up when I checked it last. We decided to do a candy chute with a bell, so folks could stay apart, but still get candy. I made my soup, but we kept it to immediate family only this year. The kids didn't seem to mind, and still made out like little bandits.

Z listeners responded to a Facebook post asking them how things were done differently.  Take a look at the costumes ya'll wanted to share as well as comments on how you all did things differently this year.