Go ahead. Do it. Show me one person that actually finds benefit in having these spread throughout Northern New England. If you show me one person then I'll completely eat crow on this, but I'd be hard-pressed to find someone who legitimately thinks these are helpful.

Are they rotaries, roundabouts, or traffic circles?

First things first -- you want to experience an identity crisis? Try and figure out the proper name for these circular traffic patterns. It may be a geographical thing, but I've heard them referenced as rotaries, as roundabouts, and as traffic circles.

I've also heard them referenced as some explicit names that aren't suitable for this article, but you get the idea. There actually is apparently a difference, though. According to the NHDOT, roundabouts are smaller versions of traffic circles, which creates a safer and slower driving experience. Oh, and according to the Maine DOT, it's apparently traffic calming, too.

If you took a shot for every single time you entered a rotary/roundabout/traffic circle and either heard a horn honk or saw a middle finger fly out a window, you'd need your stomach pumped within five minutes.

Does the Department of Transportation in either state or any state for that matter, even believe the information they put in their brochures? Seriously? Traffic CALMING? If you took a shot for every single time you entered a rotary/roundabout/traffic circle and either heard a horn honk or saw a middle finger fly out a window, you'd need your stomach pumped within five minutes.

How to use a roundabout

The City of Ottawa developed an under-two-minute video on how to use a roundabout, complete with nifty little dance music. It's worth a watch, if but nothing for eyerolling entertainment.

That'd be helpful if it actually came close to looking realistic, but name me one time where, unless it's late night or super early morning, only one car at a time is approaching any part of a rotary/roundabout/traffic circle. Because it's never like that, and the proof is in the live stream below in the Derry Traffic Circle in Derry, New Hampshire.

Defensive driving doesn't work in most of New England, especially through traffic circles!

 THAT'S what a roundabout ACTUALLY looks like. Full of cars driven by impatient, aggressive drivers. And the thing is, it's not even completely their fault. In reality and not City of Ottawa instructional videos, if you ever want to get to Point B from Point A and a traffic circle is along the way, you have to be an offensive driver. Defensive driving doesn't work in most of New England, especially through traffic circles!

But the thing is, drivers just tend to do stupid things while either trying to enter the circle or while already in the middle of it. In fact, just this past weekend in that very circle, a car I was behind through the circle came to a dead-stop jam of the brakes for zero reason. No one else was trying to enter, no one was doing a slow creep to try and merge -- NOTHING.

It's situations like that that don't make rotaries/roundabouts/traffic circles safe or traffic calming, it makes them dangerous areas to be in and proves that they are the dumbest features in Maine, New Hampshire, and the rest of Northern (and either Southern) New England.

Speaking of driving, see how much gasoline cost the year you started out behind the wheel

To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.

Since it's supposed to snow tomorrow, see these 7 Reminder Tips For Native New Englanders Driving in the Snow

Look Out for These 5 Kinds of Drivers in Maine Snow

5 Drivers You'll See on New Hampshire Roads This Winter