There has always been a delicate balance between humans and the wildlife around us. Especially in Maine, where residents have a special appreciation for all creatures that call the state home.

One of the sad but true observations many of us make in Maine is roadkill, whether that's a groundhog, squirrel, or other small creature that didn't make it across the road in time and met their demise. Unfortunately, not all roadkill stories are equal.

One recent story of roadkill in Maine has a twist and it's likely to pull at your heartstrings. An officer in Eliot, Maine, arrived on the scene where an entire family of raccoons appeared to have been crushed by a passing vehicle while crossing the road, according to the Saco River Wildlife Center.

Upon closer inspection, the officer determined that one baby raccoon had survived the ordeal. The officer rushed to save the small animal and get it to the proper individuals who could help it immediately and give it the best chance at life.

Facebook via Saco River Wildlife Center
Facebook via Saco River Wildlife Center
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Unfortunately, the baby raccoon lost its entire family in the road incident. Saco River Wildlife Center is now looking for donations that will ensure that they can continue to provide care, food, and a safe environment for the now-orphaned baby raccoon. They have several different ways to donate and support the wildlife in their care.

Maine ranks among the top 20 states in the nation in animal collisions every year. A number of factors contribute to those collisions, including poorly-lit roadways, destruction of animal habitats, and rates of speed from drivers.


 

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