It was a close call Monday as two kids and an adult suffered an electric shock while swimming in a pool at an Eddington campground.

According to the Penobscot County Sheriff's Office, the incident took place at the Cold River Campground on Route 178 at about 2:30 PM Monday.

"Two children and one adult who were in the pool were transported by ambulance to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. The pool has been closed until further investigation and assessments can be completed. This investigation remains active at this time. "

The Eddintgon Fire Department said folks on hand did their best to help, some at their own peril.

"Several bystanders jumped into action risking his/her own lives to save another. We were assisted by two Northern Light Ambulances, Bangor Fire Ambulance, and the Sheriff's Dept."

According to the website Electrocuted.com, getting shocked in a pool is still a fairly rare occurrence:

"According to the swimming pool electrocution statistics published by the US. Consumer Product Safety Commission, 33 people lost their lives and 33 were injured due to pool electrocutions between 2002 and 2018. The Electric Shock Drowning Prevention Association also reports that a teen died at a hotel in Texas in 2020."

The site says some of the main reasons why folks get shocked at pools include faulty electrical wiring to pool equipment, no GFCI to nearby outlets, and electrical cords too close to the water.

This incident is being investigated by the Penobscot Sheriff's Office, The Eddington Fire Department along with Versant Power and the Maine Electrocution Examining Board.

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