Lost in fog and freezing rain this plane went down on a ridge on Bald Mountain in 1961 on its way to Bangor, and there it rests over 50 years later!

One of the most complete plane crash sites in the state, this F-101B 'Voodoo' Interceptor of the 75th Fighter Interceptor Squadron at Dow Air Force Base is a sad reminder of those serving who gave their lives during the Cold War Era. We had seen the remnants of the old ski lodge on the other side of this mountain but when we heard about the remnants of a Cold War era plane crash we had to check it out!

The two men on board were Captain Vernal Johnson and Lt. Edward Masaitis. Unfortunately both men lost their lives in this crash and the site now serves as a memorial to the them. A memorial plaque near a debris pile asks that no one take anything from that site, and to be respectful. It's clear some have not read the sign or have ignored it as some parts of the wreckage has been vandalized.

The memorial plaque is north of the largest part of the crash site out of the woods on a section of just bald faced rock. A indistinct trail runs south from the plaque to the majority of the plane and a broken wing which is also marked by a white cross. Read more about the crash here.

Luckily a lot of the site remains respectfully untouched and it is quite out of the way of being disturbed. In fact there seems to be no definitive trail to the memorial or the crash.  Most of the land surrounding the crash is private and highly marked, but if you don't mind a lot of trail-less treking and are good with maps and a compass the site is accessible without using private roads or trespassing on private property.

While approaching the site we also found some debris in the forest about .3 miles away! We were not exactly sure what any of the twisted pieces of metal there were. A large

Did you even know this crash was here?! The only other plane crash site in Maine with debris of this size still able to be visited is near Greenville on Elephant Mountain. That crash caused more loss of life than the "Voodoo" crash and is easier to access.

For more plane crash sites in Maine visit the Avation Archeology website.